New exhibit in Tucson explores the legacy of the Mexican serape | leisure



The Arizona State Museum has reopened to the general public with a new exhibition, Wrapped in Color: Legacies of the Mexican Sarape.


AE Araiza, Arizona Daily Star

Arizona Daily Star

The Arizona State Museum has reopened to the general public with a new exhibition, Wrapped in Color: Legacies of the Mexican Sarape.

For thousands of years, Indigenous peoples of America have woven textiles on backbelt looms from local materials such as cotton, other plant fibers, and animal hair, a press release said. The serape is particularly associated with the city of Saltillo (the largest and capital of the Mexican state of Coahuila), where it was a popular commodity from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

The exhibition tells the story of the iconic textile through historical and contemporary Indigenous, Mexican and New Mexican examples, including six woven ones by Porfirio Gutiérrez, a renowned Zapotec textile artist and guest curator of the exhibition.

Gutiérrez is based in California and was born and raised in the historic Zapotec textile community of Teotitlán del Valle in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Visitors will also learn about growing wild plants and insects to make dyes and how the Porfirio Gutiérrez Studio is helping a new generation of weavers deepen their connection to Zapotec culture and embark on a path to preserving their identity for the future, it says in a press release.

Other related objects, photographs, illustrations and videos will also be on display.

The Arizona State Museum exhibit galleries are open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is located at 1013 E. University Blvd.

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